Menstruation Adolescents at Risk Early Breast Cancer

GENERALLY, adolescents who are overweight or obese get first menstruation earlier than their friends the same age with normal weight. Apparently, early menstruation associated with obesity problems experienced by their mothers.

Is not a new fact today when teenagers get their menstruation at an increasingly early age, ie over 13 years. Experts increasingly worried about the obesity epidemic could lead to the greater tendency of considering the risks that lurk.

“Early Menstruation linked to health problems later in life such as breast cancer,” said Sarah Keim, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, United States who was not involved in this research.

“Teenagers who get earlier menstruation also are more likely to have sex sooner than their peers who ultimately increase the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases,” adds Keim, as quoted by Reuters Health, Friday (25/03/2011).

To get the conclusion of this study, Danish researchers used information on body mass index (BMI)-measurement of height versus weight-approximately 3200 Danish teenagers who early period between 1984 and 1987.

On average, a girl got my period approximately 25 days earlier for every increase her BMI. As an illustration, the addition of a BMI equal to approximately six pounds.

“Adolescent overweight and obesity, they got my period three to five months before another teenager with normal weight,” said Anshu Shrestha, a graduate student at UCLA School of Public Health, who worked on this study.

My mother contributed to

Indeed, previous studies have demonstrated the relationship between BMI and age teens start of menstruation.

“But this study, who had just done, showed the stronger relationship in the generation before them,” he said.

The researchers also found that maternal weight associated with when her daughter started menstruating. For each point increase in BMI during pregnancy, menstrual period the child will come approximately one week earlier. Similarly, according to a new study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility.

Keim said the findings of this Danish researchers reinforce the importance of maintaining a healthy weight.

“It’s important for your entire life, ranging from the very beginning. Because in fact, can affect your child’s health,” he said.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: